Have You Taken Your Daily Dose of Science?

Why? Because Science.

Hello possums!

I sincerely hope you’ve been doing your homework by keeping an eye on the new “Why? Because Science.” Here’s what’s been happening this week:

Amazing Science Video: Epic Rap Battle # 2 – You absolutely have to watch this CLASSIC and utterly hilarious staged battle between Sir Isaac Newton and Bill Nye the Science Guy. Look out for Neil DeGrasse Tyson towards the end!

Epic Rap battles of history

Blog Post: Life on Mars – Relocation, Relocation, Relocation! – Would YOU relocate to Mars? With soaring mountains, plummeting canyons, skiing at the polar ice caps and a 17km high volcano, your tourist itinerary would be full.

mars-landscape-deep-valleys

Daily Dose of Funny Science – Your Sciencey LOL of the day

Blog Post: Gravity and the Laws of Attraction, Somewhat Revised – How “heavy” is your attraction to your sexy crush? Figure it out using Newton’s elementary equation.

gravity and the laws of attractionIs the force strong with you?

Amazing Science Video:…

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Dawn Captures the Bestest Images Ever of “Hipster Planet” Ceres

Lights in the Dark

Animation of Ceres made from images acquired by Dawn on Jan. 25, 2015. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA)Animation of Ceres made from images acquired by Dawn on Jan. 25, 2015. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA)

This is the second animation from Dawn this year showing Ceres rotating, and at 43 pixels across the images are officially the best ever obtained!

NASA’s Dawn spacecraft is now on final approach to the 590-mile-wide dwarf planet Ceres, the largest world in the main asteroid belt and the biggest object in the inner Solar System that has yet to be explored closely. And, based on what one Dawn mission scientist has said, Ceres could very well be called the Solar System’s “hipster planet.”

“Ceres is a ‘planet’ that you’ve probably never heard of,” said Robert Mase, Dawn project manager at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. “We’re excited to learn all about it with Dawn and share our discoveries with the world.”

(Hmm… so does this mean Ceres has gone “mainstream?”)

Read the rest of this article on Universe Today here.

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Blast Force: The Invisible War on the Brain

This is also interesting.

Longreads

After the First World War, family and friends said that sometimes, boys came back from overseas “not right in the head.” Nearly 100 years later, the American military is only just starting to understand the effects of bomb blasts on soldiers’ brains and the prescience of those casual observations. Caroline Alexander reports in National Geographic on Traumatic Brain Injury and its devastating effects on soldiers and their families.

“Most of our medical research on blast injuries was either on fragmentation wounds or what happens in gas-filled organs—everyone was always concerned in a thermonuclear explosion what happened to your lungs and your gastrointestinal tract,” Lt. Col. Kevin “Kit” Parker, the Tarr Family Professor of Bioengineering and Applied Physics at Harvard, told me. “We completely overlooked the brain. Today the enemy has developed a weapon system that is targeted toward our scientific weak spot.”

Parker, a towering figure with a shaved head…

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