Slither and Hiss: Four Stories About Snakes

Longreads

This week, I’m sharing four stories about snakes and the people who love, hate, and tolerate them in equal measure. But first, a haiku:

Scary, beautiful
Important to religion
Slithering and scaled.

1. “The Pentecostal Serpent.” (Asher Elbein, The Bitter Southerner, September 2014)

An Atlanta zoo. A dusty office at the University of Tennessee. The mountains of Appalachia. A small church in Alabama. How has the life of the handled snake touched each of these?

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Have You Taken Your Daily Dose of Science?

Why? Because Science.

Hello possums!

I sincerely hope you’ve been doing your homework by keeping an eye on the new “Why? Because Science.” Here’s what’s been happening this week:

Amazing Science Video: Epic Rap Battle # 2 – You absolutely have to watch this CLASSIC and utterly hilarious staged battle between Sir Isaac Newton and Bill Nye the Science Guy. Look out for Neil DeGrasse Tyson towards the end!

Epic Rap battles of history

Blog Post: Life on Mars – Relocation, Relocation, Relocation! – Would YOU relocate to Mars? With soaring mountains, plummeting canyons, skiing at the polar ice caps and a 17km high volcano, your tourist itinerary would be full.

mars-landscape-deep-valleys

Daily Dose of Funny Science – Your Sciencey LOL of the day

Blog Post: Gravity and the Laws of Attraction, Somewhat Revised – How “heavy” is your attraction to your sexy crush? Figure it out using Newton’s elementary equation.

gravity and the laws of attractionIs the force strong with you?

Amazing Science Video:…

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What Street Suffixes Can Tell Us About Home Value and Neighborhood Size

Longreads

Next we looked at street suffixes — the “roads,” “drives” and “boulevards” — and found that, for instance, homes on “Washington Street” are usually different from homes on “Washington Court.”

For one thing, a house on Washington Street is probably older. Different street suffixes were popular at different moments. “Streets” and “avenues” were stylish in the 1950s, “ways,” “circles” and “courts” in the late ’80s.

Street suffixes also offer clues about the size of their neighborhood. Boulevards and avenues include the most homes on average, while courts and lanes include the fewest.

Most significant, suffixes have a lot to say about home prices. Homes on “streets” are almost always among the least valuable. If you’re looking for a higher-value home, you’re much more likely to find it on a “way” or a “place.”

Spencer Rascoff and Stan Humphries, writing for the New York Times. Rascoff and Humphries analyzed years…

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